Churches in Sussex

Shermanbury

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Shermanbury Photo Tour 2002


Candle sticks and on the box pews the names of local farms for which sittings were reserved
from SCM 1938

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SUSSEX CHURCH PLANS, No. XC 
ST. GILES, SHERMANBURY

There is mention of a little church here in the Domesday Survey. Some carved stones from a 12th century building were discovered on the site about the year 1900, but the present fabric seems to date from the early 14th century. When the Chancel was " restored " by Richard Ward (1677--1706) the chancel arch must have been removed and the nave extended eastwards, at the expense of the chancel as shown conjecturally on the plan. The existence of the piscina serving the south altar of the nave confirms this. The south and north doors are blocked, the entrance being through the west wall which was rebuilt in the 18th century, when according to an inscription under the royal arms (Queen Anne) John Gratwick restored the church in 1710. At the west end of the roof is a small weatherboarded belfry with two bells under a small spire.
The fittings include the font (13th century), 18th century pews with the names of the old houses of the parish painted on them, heraldic glass (Tudor royal arms) and 17th and 18th century plate. There are several 18th century monuments and some fine memorial stones in the churchyard. W.H.G.


From Sussex Notes & Queries Vol XIII No. 3 August 1950 Page 62
Reproduced by courtesy of the Sussex Archaeological Society (SAS). 
SAS grants this licence for the stated purpose in respect of such rights as SAS may have over the articles, 
but those rights may not include the author's copyright in the words and/or images.

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